• "Every once in awhile a writer of particular skills takes a fresh, seemingly improbable idea and turns out a book of pure delight." That';s how David McCullough described Mark Kurlansky';s Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World, a work that revealed how a meal can be as important as it is edible. Salt: A World History, its successor, did the same for a seasoning, and confirmed Kurlansky as one of our most erudite and entertaining food authors. Now, the winner of the James Beard Award for Excellence in Food Writing shares a varied selection of "choice cuts" by others, as he leads us on a mouthwatering culinary tour around the world and through history and culture from the fifth century B.C. to the present day.
    Choice Cuts features more than two hundred pieces, from Cato to Cab Calloway. Here are essays by Plato on the art of cooking . . . Pablo Neruda on french fries . . . Alice B. Toklas on killing a carp . . . M. F. K. Fisher on the virility of Turkish desserts . . . Alexandre Dumas on coffee . . . W. H. Auden on Icelandic food . . . Elizabeth David on the downward march of English pizza . . . Claude Lévi-Strauss on "the idea of rotten" . . . James Beard on scrambled eggs . . . Balzac, Virginia Woolf, E. M. Forster, Chekhov, and many other famous gourmands and gourmets, accomplished cooks, or just plain ravenous writers on the passions of cuisine.

  • "Este es un clàsico de Kurlansky: erudito, impredecible, compasivo, y se lee compulsivamente. . . . Una reveladora meditacion sobre el deporte, la nacion, y también sobre el mundo".
    -Junot Díaz, autor de La breve y maravillosa vida de Oscar Wao
    "ÂQué tienen en comùn Rico Carty, Alfredo Griffin, Pedro Guerrero, George Bell, Julio Franco, Juan Samuel, Sammy Sosa, Alfonso Soriano, y Robinson Cano? Que todos proceden de San Pedro de Macorís, la pequeïa ciudad azucarera en la Repùblica Dominicana. ÂUna coincidencia? Difícilmente". -National Public Radio
    Al final de la temporada de 2010, màs de ochenta y seis jovenes y hombres de la empobrecida ciudad de San Pedro de Macorís jugaban en las Grandes Ligas -lo que significa que uno de cada seis dominicanos de las Grandes Ligas vinieron de los mismos equipos locales de los ingenios azucareros, y acudieron en masa a los Estados Unidos en busca de oportunidades, de riqueza, y de una vida mejor. Pero este viaje es también una cronica del racismo en el béisbol, de la necesidad de cambiar las costumbres sociales del deporte en la Repùblica Dominicana y en los Estados Unidos, y de las historias personales de los hombres que han buscado escapar de la pobreza jugando béisbol.
    En Las Estrellas Orientales, Mark Kurlansky revela el amor de dos países por un deporte, y descubre unos significados màs profundos sobre lugar y identidad, tenacidad y supervivencia, colonialismo y capitalismo, pero especialmente sobre el béisbol.

  • "A fantastic social history" from the author of Salt and Cod (USA Today) In the Dominican Republic town of San Pedro de Macorís, baseball is often seen as the only way to a better life. For those who make it, the million-dollar paychecks from Major League Baseball mean that not only they, but their entire families as well, have been saved from grinding poverty. The successful few set an example that dazzles the neighbors they left behind. But for the majority, this dream is illusory.
    In The Eastern Stars, New York Times bestselling author Mark Kurlansky reveals the connection between two countries' love affair with a sport, and the remarkable journey of impoverished San Pedro and its baseball players-including Rico Carty, Albert Pujols, Robinson Cano, Sammy Sosa, and Alfonso Soriano-who have sought freedom from poverty through playing ball.

  • Anglais Edible Stories

    Kurlansky Mark

    All-new stories about the food we share, love, and fight over from the national bestselling author of Cod and Salt.
    In these linked stories, Mark Kurlansky reveals the bond that can hold people together, tear them apart, or make them become vegan: food. Through muffins or hot dogs, an indigenous Alaskan fish soup, a bean curd Thanksgiving turkey or potentially toxic crème brulee, a rotating cast of characters learns how to honor the past, how to realize you're not in love with someone any more, and how to forgive. These women and men meet and eat and love, leave and drink and in the end, come together in Seattle as they are as inextricably linked with each other as they are with the food they eat and the wine they drink.
    Kurlansky brings a keen eye and unerring sense of humanity to these stories. And throughout, his love and knowledge of food shows just how important a role what we eat plays in our lives.

  • Anglais Salt

    Kurlansky Mark

    Homer called it a divine substance. Plato described it as especially dear to the gods. As Mark Kurlansky so brilliantly relates here, salt has shaped civilisation from the beginning, and its story is a glittering, often surprising part of the history of mankind. Wars have been fought over salt and, while salt taxes secured empires across Europe and Asia, they have also inspired revolution - Gandhi's salt march in 1930 began the overthrow of British rule in India. From the rural Sichuan province where the last home-made soya sauce is made to the Cheshire brine springs that supplied salt around the globe, Mark Kurlansky has produced a kaleidoscope of world history, a multilayered masterpiece that blends political, commercial, scientific, religious and culinary records into a rich and memorable tale

  • From the New York Times bestselling author who "powerfully demonstrates the defining role food plays in history and culture" (Atlanta Journal-Constitution).
    In the throes of the Great Depression, a make-work initiative for authors-called "America Eats"-was created by the WPA to chronicle the eating habits, traditions, and struggles of local Americans. Mark Kurlansky, author of Salt and Cod, unearths this forgotten literary treasure, chronicling a bygone era when Americans had never heard of fast food or grocery superstores. Kurlansky brings together the WPA contributions-featuring New York automats and Georgia Coca-Cola parties, Maine lobsters and Montana beaver tails-and brilliantly showcases them with authentic recipes, anecdotes, and photographs.

  • More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA

  • More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA

  • More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA

  • Anglais Cod

    Kurlansky Mark


    From the Bestselling Author of Salt and The Basque History of the World
    Cod, Mark Kurlansky’s third work of nonfiction and winner of the 1999 James Beard Award, is the biography of a single species of fish, but it may as well be a world history with this humble fish as its recurring main character. Cod, it turns out, is the reason Europeans set sail across the Atlantic, and it is the only reason they could. What did the Vikings eat in icy Greenland and on the five expeditions to America recorded in the Icelandic sagas? Cod, frozen and dried in the frosty air, then broken into pieces and eaten like hardtack. What was the staple of the medieval diet? Cod again, sold salted by the Basques, an enigmatic people with a mysterious, unlimited supply of cod. As we make our way through the centuries of cod history, we also find a delicious legacy of recipes, and the tragic story of environmental failure, of depleted fishing stocks where once their numbers were legendary. In this lovely, thoughtful history, Mark Kurlansky ponders the question: Is the fish that changed the world forever changed by the world's folly?
    ;
    “A charming fish tale and a pretty gift for your favorite seafood cook or fishing monomaniac. But in the last analysis, it’s a bitter ecological fable for our time.” –Los Angeles Times
    ;
    “Every once in a while a writer of particular skill takes a fresh, seemingly improbable idea and turns out a book of pure delight. Such is the case of Mark Kurlansky and the codfish.” –David McCullough
    ;
    “One of the 25 Best Books of the Year.” –The New York Public Library
    Mark Kurlansky is the author of many books including Salt, The Basque History of the World, 1968, and The Big Oyster. His newest book is Birdseye.

  • Anglais City Beasts

    Kurlansky Mark

    All-new stories about the urban worlds where animals and humans fight, love, and find common ground, from the nationally bestselling author of Cod and Salt.
    In these stories, Mark Kurlansky journeys to his familiar haunts like New York's Central Park or Miami's Little Havana but with an original, earthy, and adventurous perspective. From baseball players in the Dominican Republic to Basque separatists in Spain to a restaurant owner in Cuba, from urban coyotes to a murder of crows, Kurlansky travels the worlds of animals and their human counterparts, revealing moving and hilarious truths about our connected existence.
    In the end, he illuminates how closely our worlds are aligned, how humans really are beasts, susceptible to their basest instincts, their wildest dreams, and their artful survival.

  • En raison de ses multiples usages, le Sel est une véritable obsession universelle. Objet d'une quête acharnée et d'un commerce actif, il a suscité depuis des millénaires des guerres sans fin. Longtemps symbole de richesse, les marchands des Antilles le stockaient dans leurs caves. Les Chinois, les Romains, les Français, les Vénitiens, les Habsbourg et bien d'autres États ont levé des impôts sur le sel pour financer des guerres. Les soldats et parfois les ouvriers étaient payés en sel. Gandhi a volontairement violé le monopole anglais sur le sel et organisé une « marche du sel » qui conduira l'Inde à l'indépendance... A l'aune de cet unique minéral alimentaire, se dessine une autre histoire du monde ... qui ne manque pas de sel !
    Un auteur à succès et un best-seller vendu aux USA à 160 000 exemplaires.

  • SALMON

    Mark Kurlansky

    Grand format 26.90 €
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  • Anglais SALT - A WORLD HISTORY

    Mark Kurlansky

    Homer called salt "a divine substance", while Plato described it as "especially dear to the gods". Kurlansky blends political, commercial, scientific, religious and culinary records into this history of the substance, which he claims shaped civilization from the beginning.

    Poche 17.50 €
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  • The conventional history of nations, even continents, is a history of warfare. According to this view, all the important ideas and significant changes of humankind were put forward in an effort to win one violent bloody conflict or another. In this exploration of pacifism, various views are discussed alongside several non-violence theorists.

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  • Will most of the major fisheries of the world be exhausted by 2048, as has been claimed? Have the number of large fish in the ocean decreased by 90 per cent over the past 50 years, as has been asserted by a respected scientist? Are 60 per cent of the fish species studied by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation either fully exploited or depleted, as one of their reports attests? Fishing at sea, an ancient trade and a way of life that has defined coastal towns throughout history, may be coming to an end. The culture and traditions of coastal Britain and of seagoing nations everywhere are now threatened with extinction.

    In his most important book yet, Mark Kurlansky - the celebrated author of Cod, Salt and The Big Oyster - explores the fate of our oceans and the decline of our most ancient coastal enterprise. The Last Fish Tale sends up a timely distress flare but one which brilliantly illuminates a colourful, exuberant and poignant landscape, from Newlyn in Cornwall to Gloucester in Massachusetts - a fishing village first settled by Englishmen in the early 1600s. The result is a cultural, economic, environmental and culinary bouillabaisse - the most compelling fish tale of our time.

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  • Pour elle, on a déclaré des guerres, déclenché des révolutions. Elle a été la base de l'alimentation de nation entières. Des économies en ont dépendu. Elle a accompagné la colonisation de l'Amérique du Nord. Pour les millions d'êtres qu'elle a fait vivre, elle a incarné un trésor plus précieux que l'or. La morue a ainsi joué un rôle fascinant et essentiel dans l'histoire du monde. Son épopée s'étend sur mille ans et quatre continents. Les Viking la poursuivirent à travers l'Atlantique. Les Basques en firent commerce dès le Moyen Age. Elle fut l'emblème des vaisseaux de la Nouvelle-Angleterre et de Terre-Neuve comme des barques de pêcheurs côtiers, des élégants schooners comme des navires-usines labourant l'Atlantique. De ports de l'Islande, de la Scandinavie, de l'Angleterre, aux rivages du Brésil et de l'Afrique occidentale, Mark Kurlansky resuscite cette étonnante aventure. Sans oublier les recettes d'antan et d'aujourd'hui, il évoque les enjeux scientifiques et historiques, et finalement le drame d'un poisson, aujourd'hui au bord de l'extinction.

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  • Anglais Nonviolence

    Mark Kurlansky

    The conventional history of nations, even continents, is a history of warfare. According to this view, all the important ideas and significant changes of humankind occured as part of an effort to win one violent, bloody conflict or another.

    This approach to history is only one of many examples of how societies promote warfare and glorify violence. But there have always been a few who have refused to fight. Governments have long regarded this minority as a danger to society and have imprisoned and abused them and encouraged their persecution.

    This was true of those who refused Europe's wars, who refused to fight for their king, who refused to fight for Napoleon as well as against him. It was true of Virginia Woolf's sister Vanessa and her husband Clive Bell - outcasts in rural Sussex because they opposed World War I at a time when the British socialist movement described a bayonet as a weapon with a worker on each end.It was true of the first American draft dodger, a Menonite who believed in American independence but believed it was wrong to use violence and rejected the call of his local militia. It was true of the many abolitionists who had dedicated their lives to stopping slavery but refused to fight in the Civil War.

    Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism and, most impressively, the Menonites and the Quakers - all have passages in their major teachings rejecting warfare as immoral. In this brilliant exploratio of pacifism, these points of view are discussed alongside such diverse non-violence theorists as Tolstoy, Shelley, Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Aldous Huxley, Erasmus, Confucius and Lao Tse to show how many modern ideas - such as a united Europe, the United Nations, and the abolition of slavery - originated in such non-violence movements.

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