Livres en VO

  • Extrait
    SOMMAIRE
    Acknowledgments
    Abbreviations
    Foreword
    Introduction
    I. Questions
    II. Conceptual Framework
    The Concept of Big Technology
    National Systems of Innovation
    The Concept of the Knowledge Society
    III. The Status of Research, Sources and Literature
    Sources
    Research and Literature
    IV. Outline
    CHAPTER 1 - THE BEGINNINGS OF SWISS INVOLVEMENT IN EUROPEAN SPACE ACTIVITIES
    I. The Origins of ESRO
    The European Reactions to the Sputnik Launch
    First Discussions about the Establishment of a European Organisation Dedicated to Space Research
    Amaldi Meets Auger
    II. Swiss Involvement in the Early Discussions on a European Space Research Organisation Switzerland and the Amaldi/Auger Idea
    Swiss Politics Enters into the Negotiations on the European Space Research Organisation
    III. Swiss Foreign Policy in the Post-WWII Years
    IV. Setting up ESRO
    The Meyrin Conference
    COPERS Activities
    Switzerland and the Work of COPERS
    Alliance-Building in Switzerland
    V. The Case of ELDO
    VI. The Federal State and Science, Technology and Economic Policy in the Early 1960s
    CHAPTER 2 - SWISS PARTICIPATION IN ESRO
    I. Organising for Membership of ESRO
    The Ratification Process
    Institutional Measures
    II. The First Steps of ESRO
    III. Switzerland and ESRO's Science Programme
    The Space Science Activities of Swiss Research Groups
    The Swiss Discussions on the Funding of Space Research
    The Role of the Swiss Science Council Space Science without Special Funding
    IV. ESRO and Swiss Industrial Participation
    The Zenit Sounding Rocket
    The Principle of Fair Returns
    V. Applications Satellites - the First Package Deal
    The Advent of Applications Satellites
    The Interim Intelsat Agreements
    CETS Plans for European Communications Satellites
    The EBU steps in
    The "Comprehensive" Approach - the Causse Report
    The Swiss Attitude towards Applications Satellites
    Switzerland and the Launcher Question
    The Bad Godesberg Conference
    The First Package Deal
    Swiss reactions to the First Package Deal
    The Definitive Intelsat Agreements
    Intelsat as a Turning Point for Swiss Space Policy
    TABLE OF CONTENTS
    VI. The Post-Apollo Programme and Ariane - the Second Package Deal 1
    The Post-Apollo Programme
    The Birth of the Ariane Project
    The Second Package Deal
    Switzerland and the Second Package Deal
    The Ratification Process
    VII. The Transition from ESRO to ESA
    Developments at European Level
    Ratifying the ESA Convention in Switzerland
    CHAPTER 3 - SWISS PARTICIPATION IN ESA
    I. The ESRO and ESA Science Programme of the 1970s
    The Second Decade of European Space Science Activities
    Giotto and Hipparcos - Two Major European Missions
    II. Swiss Scientific Participation in the 1970s
    The Space Science Situation in Switzerland in the Late 1960s
    The Development of Swiss Space Science in the 1970s
    Space Research and Swiss Science Policy
    III. The Industrial Component of Swiss Space Activities in the 1970s
    IV. From Development Phase to Operational Use - the Case of the Meteosat and Telecom Programmes
    The User - a New Category of Actor in European Space Policy
    The Meteosat Programme
    The Swiss Meteorologists and the Meteosat Programme
    The Telecom Programme
    Switzerland and the Telecom Programme
    V. The Discussions on a Swiss DBS System
    The Tel-Sat Request
    A DBS System and Swiss Media Policy
    Handling the Tel-Sat Request
    VI. ESA's Other Major Programmes - Ariane and Spacelab
    The Ariane Programme
    The Spacelab Programme
    VII. The Microgravity and Remote Sensing Programmes
    VIII. The Administration of Space Activities in Switzerland
    IX. Setting the Stage for the European Space Policy of the 1990s
    Switzerland and the ESA Ministerial Meetings of 1985 and 1987
    Planning for the 1990s
    The Swiss Influence on the Increase in the Science Programme Budget 308
    ESA's Science Programme of the 1980s and the Horizon 2000 Programme
    The Prodex Programme
    Switzerland and the Decisions of the 1985
    ESA Ministerial Meeting
    Switzerland and the 1987 ESA Ministerial Meeting 321
    Swiss Space Policy at the End of the 1980s
    Epilogue
    Conclusion
    THE VARIOUS DIFFERENT STRANDS OF SWISS SPACE HISTORY
    I. The Importance of Foreign Policy
    II. Space Activities and Swiss Science, Technology and Industrial Policy
    The Rhetorical Strategy
    The Structural Weaknesses of the Swiss Federal
    State in Science, Technology and Industrial Policy
    The Comparison with the Case of Nuclear Technology
    III. Scientists
    IV. Industry
    V. The User Organisations
    VI. The Public
    VII. Closing Words
    Figures, Diagrams, and Pictures
    Chronology
    BIBLIOGRAPHY
    I. Sources
    Archives and other Unprinted Sources
    Printed Sources
    II. Literature
    Index of names

  • Extrait
    SOMMAIRE
    Preface
    José Maria Dorado Gutiérrez
    Foreword
    lvaro Azcorraga
    Chapter 1 : THE YEARS OF THE FIRST SPACE PLAN
    SPAIN'S EFFORTS TO CREATE CAPABILITIES IN THE FIELD OF SPACE BETWEEN 1965 AND 1975
    José Maria Dorado Gutiérrez and Pedro Sanz-Aranguez
    Chapter 2 : A RELIABLE FACILITY
    LAUNCH TOWER FOR SKYLARK ROCKET VEHICLES AT ESRANGE (SWEDEN)
    José Rivacoba and José Maria Dorado Gutiérrez
    Chapter 3 : A SPACE OBSERVATORY
    THE ESA GROUND STATION IN VILLAFRANCA DEL CASTILLO
    José Maria Dorado Gutiérrez and Miguel Angel Sabadell
    Chapter 4 : THE ORIGINS OF SPAIN'S PARTICIPATION IN ESRO
    José Manuel Sanchez-Ron
    Chapter 5 : HISTORY OF SPAIN'S PARTICIPATION IN ESA'S SCIENCE PROGRAMME
    Miguel Angel Sabadell
    Chapter 6 : THE HISTORY OF THE ARIANE LAUNCHER IN SPAIN
    Miguel Angel Llorca Palomera et alii
    Chapter 7 : SPANISH ANTENNAS ON BOARD ESA SATELLITES
    Miguel Angel Llorca and Pedro Pinto
    Chapter 8 : SPANISH DEPLOYABLE ELEMENTS AND MECHANISMS ON BOARD ESA SATELLITES AND SPACE PLATFORMS
    Fernando Artigas
    Chapter 9 : INFLUENCE OF THE EUROPEAN SPACE PROGRAMME ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SPANISH SPACE INDUSTRY
    José Maria Dorado Gutiérrez
    Space Activity in Spain. Major Achievements
    Index of names

  • This book details fifty years of European collaboration in space from the origins of the programme in 1964 to its rich complexity today. It charts the early moves by scientific statesmen and governments to establish not one, but two organisations, ESRO for science and later applications and ELDO for launchers.
    The tight financial constraints on ESRO, the tribulations of ELDO's launcher, and a major tilt towards close technological cooperation with NASA in the early 1970s led to the formation of a single organisation in 1975, ESA.
    ESA embarked on developing a new European launcher under French leadership (Ariane), and a human-rated capsule for scientific experiments to fit in the Space Shuttle's cargo bay under German leadership (Spacelab). Its science programme was put on a secure institutional footing and it launched a number of applications programmes. The 1980s are marked by the spectacular success of Ariane, the consolidation of a human presence in space through Spacelab and collaboration in the International Space Station, the development of a new framework for rationalising space science and bruising disputes over engaging users to operate application satellites.
    The global upheavals of the 1990s, the interest of the private sector in space, and an awareness of the value of space-based systems to civil society and military action on the ground obliged ESA to refashion itself again. New partnerships were forged. The launcher fleet was expanded to include the Russian Soyuz and the Italian-led Vega, a single European Astronaut Corps was created, and major new programmes for Earth observation (GMES) and satellite navigation (Galileo) were embarked on in cooperation with the European Union.
    The history of Europe's presence in space is above all a history of political will, of industrial development, and of the consolidation of extensive scientific, technological and managerial competencies to construct a global space power that could compete and collaborate from a position of strength with the US and the USSR/Russia, while adapting to the changing demands of a new geopolitical world order in the 21st century.

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