Vertical Inc. Digital

  • Anglais EDGE

    Koji Suzuki

    Edge begins with a massive and catastrophic shifting of the San Andreas fault. The fears of California someday tumbling into the sea--that have become the stuff of parody--become real. But even the terror resulting from this catastrophe pales in comparison to the understanding behind its happening, a cataclysm extending beyond mankind's understanding of horror as it had previously been known. The world is falling apart because things are out of joint at the quantum level, about which of course there's never been any guarantee that everything has to remain stable.
    Koji Suzuki returns to the genre he's most famous for after many years of "not wanting to write any more horror." As expected from Suzuki, the chills are of a more cerebral, psychological sort, arguably more unsettling and scary than the slice-and-dice gore fests that horror has become known in the U.S. Never content to simply do "Suzuki"--as it were--but rather push the envelope on what horror is in general and for which readers have come to know him, Edge City borders on being cutting-edge science fiction. The author himself terms this novel, which he has worked on for some years, a work of "quantum horror."

  • In the climactic closing months of World War II, Allied Intelligence officers are summoned to the Malcañan Palace in Manila to be briefed by General MacArthurs Intelligence Staff on the optimal conclusion to the conflict in the Pacific Theater. Intelligence collected at the time concluded that the Americans had only three options to effectively force the Imperial Japanese Military into surrender: encirclement, blockade, and bombardment; isolating Japan from its forces in China, Korea, and Formosa; or engaging Japan through a full-scale amphibious invasion.
    In the debut novel by Michael Dana Kennedy, Japanese-American Lt. Ken Kobayashi must straddle a delicate line between duty to country and honor to his family as he is assigned by General MacArthur to infiltrate the Imperial Japanese Army in the lead-up to an invasion of the Japanese archipelago. From the deck of the U.S.S. Yorktown to the halls of the Imperial Ministry of War in Ichigaya in Tokyo, The Flowers of Edo reveals the intricacies of the military machine and the human and cultural price that was paid in the bombings on Japan through a perspective never before seen in fiction. Meticulously researched and endorsed by military insiders and historians from both sides of the Pacific, Lt. Kobayashis tale of espionage and romance will shed new light on what might have happened.

  • Author KIMIKO was a fulltime housewife and mother of two children who at the age of 36 discovered the mental and physical benefits of walking properly. Born and raised in Okayama--a prefecture west of Osaka--she attended an all-girls high school and was later hired by the Tokyo office of a cosmetics company. At the age of 27, she took the recommendations of a customer and met a financially secure man of 32 who was being groomed to take over his family's business. Falling prey to her friends' urgings to "marry a rich man" and her own ideas of equating marriage with stability, she got married soon thereafter. Though her husband was faithful, kind, and hardworking, and she provided office work for the family business, she found her marriage wanting until she realized one day that she "had nothing for herself in her life." She felt her "sense of self slipping away." It was then that she decided to take a walking class.
    Within two years Kimiko was teaching walking herself, refining the lessons she'd learned in other walking classes and applying life-affirming lessons to her process. Though the basics of proper walking technique and posture are outlined, the extension of spiritual growth and reaffirmation methods from applying them supply the body of the text. Some of the lessons KIMIKO discusses include:
    · Turning on the Positive Switch--Complimenting yourself throughout the day can elevate your confidence and spirit in everything you do · Discovering the Beauty Within You--Making a list of 100 aspects of your worthiness will help reverse the inner feelings of self-loathing and strengthen self-esteem · Make Yourself a High-Class Brand--Learning and applying the proper posture gained through walking will present an air of confidence and good looks that no amount of brand fashions and make-up can rival · How to Be Treated Preciously by Others--Don't short-change those things to which you treat yourself, otherwise others will shortchange you · Walking Effectively to Activate Your Positive Switch--The simple act of walking properly--head up, weight back, rolling your foot forward heal-to-toe--will cause a spiritual shift

  • Have you had great sex? Oh, you may think you have, at times eliciting vocal responses or squirms of seeming pleasure from your partner. And in comparison to your peers, your intimate moments may be a step above the curve. But according to author of Slow Sex Secrets: Lessons from the Master Masseur Adam Tokunaga, you haven't. Why? Because only he has had truly earthshattering sex, and because only he has unlocked the secrets to the kind of sex that even the ancient Indian masters of the Kama Sutra envy.
    A word-of-mouth bestseller in Japan, Slow Sex Secrets: Lessons from the Master Masseur enlightens todays selfish man to the debilitating effects of self-centered sex. Through in-depth analyses, based on more than a thousand sexual encounters with women, Japanese sexpert Adam Tokunaga reveals the secrets to having mind-blowing sex. Concepts and strategies include:
    Time--the magic word. But dont be fooled; longer is not necessarily the key, but an important facet to be married with quality.
    The plague of junk sex--mens concept of orgasming as if the act were the finish line of a race to be run as quickly as possible, leaving women to become disillusioned with sex, causing them to become frigid.
    The Adam Touch--Tokunagas secret massage-derived technique that drives women wild.
    Adams G-spt, the amazing T-spot, and uncovering the secrets of the mysterious A-spot.

  • Until pain, memory, resignation and fury are all subsumed by the one possible conclusion, a thing or two may just be worth doing. Thus a nameless former cop who should never have become a private detective awaits clients in a dingy office across the street from a Chinese restaurant.
    Impeccably paced and snappily told, even when the truth grows murky, hard-boiled has never come as smooth and pure as in this choice distillation by way of Tokyo, Japan. Warning: No dogs, cute or otherwise, appear in this novel, in or out of water.
    Legendary manga artist Kazuhiro Kiuchi (Be-bop High School) makes his English language debut as a novelist!

  • Death and the Flower is a collection of six short stories centered on the themes of family and peril. The title is derived from a Keith Jarrett album of the same name.

  • Stay informed. Talk about the issues. Always be engaged. Liberal societies have encouraged their members to take part--or at least interest--in politics. Yet, even in developed nations where it is said to work, the democratic process as we know it routinely fails to give voice, on the one hand, and to appeal at all, on the other hand, to a good number of citizens. Whatever countervailing hopes the worldwide web gave rise to in its dawning years, far from restoring the “public sphere” of yore, the internet has completed its fragmentation. According to Japanese thinker Hiroki Azuma, the way forward must be sought through what network technology is actually good at: aggregating and processing the traces we leave (without always meaning to) every time we wade into the world of connectivity. Harking back to Rousseau and his idea of the general will, dropping by Freud and his discovery of the unconscious, taking inspiration from Google and the tenor of its innovations, revisiting Christopher Alexander and his highway planning, and making curious bedfellows of Twitter, Rorty, and Nozick, General Will 2.0 is a wild ride bound to delight not just citizens who “care” but those who find doing so to be increasingly difficult and false.

  • Akira Kurosawa has been regarded as one of the most important and influential filmmakers in the history of cinema, and one man stood beside him for most of his illustrious career - his screenwriter and collabrator Shinobu Hashimoto. In Compound Cinematics, Hashimoto pulls back the camera and reveals the actual process of how such global hits as The Seven Samurai, To Live and Roshamon were made from within the writer's studio to the very sets of Kagemusha and Ran.

  • A young man makes a shocking discovery while visiting his parents’ home. Along with a purse and a lock of hair that may have belonged to his recently deceased mother, Ryosuke finds three journals with notes that seem to be the confessions of a murderer. Now, he has to figure out what’s fact, what’s fiction...and who are these people he’s called “Mom” and “Dad.”

  • Told in the manner of scientific reports, this collection of science fiction stories explores the allegorical overtones about the precariousness of species. Biogenesis and Other Stories collects five stories by Tatsuaki Ishiguro. In Biogenesis, two professors research the rare winged mouse and how the genetic makeup of the creatures pointed to their eventual extinction. The discover that upon mating, both the male and female of the species died. The professors try to clone the winged mice without success, so they breed the remaining pair in captivity, noting the procedure, which includes a vibration of the creatures' wings, what appeared to be kissing, and the shedding of tears--composed of the same substance as their blood--until their eventual death.

  • BASIS OF THE TAKASHI MIIKE FILM SOON TO BE A MOTION PICTURE STATESIDE Ever since Assistant Inspector Mekari’s wife passed away, he has found no joy in living. As a member of Japan’s security police, he once served in the prime minister’s detail, but it’s been a while since he took himself off the promotion track. He thinks he’s ready to take a bullet, but something begins to change in him when he’s ordered to escort a child rapist-murderer who relapsed after being released from prison. The multibillionaire grandfather of the suspect’s new victim is offering a staggering bounty to anyone who would kill the man, Kiyomaru, who might be spared the noose yet again. The government and the police brass, meanwhile, can’t tolerate such a challenge to the rule of law and their own authority. From the southern city where, fearing for his life, Kiyomaru has turned himself in, he must be transported alive to Tokyo, where the crime occurred. As Mekari and the transfer team weave their way across the nation, its entire populace seems to salivate for the billion-yen reward. On guard against both civilian aspirants and fellow cops, the depressed assistant inspector has to wonder: What is duty? What is his?

  • Anglais Parasite Eve

    Hideaki Sena

    When Dr. Nagashima loses his wife in a mysterious car crash, he is overwhelmed with grief but also an eerie sense of purpose; he becomes obsessed wiht reincarnating his dead wife. Her donated kidney is transplanted into a young girl wiht a debilitating disorder, bu the doctor also feels compelled to keep a small sample of her liver in his laboratory. When these cells start mutating rapidly, a consciousness bent on determining its own fate awakens, bent on becoming the new dominant species on earth.
    Parasite Eve was the basis of the hugely popular videogame of the same name in the U.S. and has been cinematized in Japan.

  • The horror, of seemingly ordinary people doing horrifying things, can take the eyes of just as seemingly ordinary people to see.
    Tall, soft-spoken Natsume used to work with troubled kids at a reformatory but resigned mid-career to become a police detective. Those who’ve known him wonder why the gentlest of men, whose vocation had been to have faith in humans, now doubts them professionally. The truths of his path unfold over seven carefully crafted chapters, each of which stands on its own as a short story with the power to move and delight the most seasoned reader.
    Determination, not vengeance, animates A Cop’s Eyes, its focus neither well-placed punches, nor even stunning feats of forensics, but the stubbornly interpersonal dimension of detective work. An anti-hero in a wholly different vein from noir protagonists, the ying to Dirty Harry’s yang, Natsume will endear himself to fans of understated Robert Parker goodness and the late Peter Falk’s Lt. Columbo.

  • Revered restaurateur Jiro’s extended chat on all things sushi shocked the industry and aficionados alike when it was first published in 1997 and has remained indispensable over the years thanks to his nonchalant revelation of top trade secrets. While first and last things cannot be so easily taught and the Sukiyabashi experience has stayed as unique as he warned with a wink, it is no exaggeration to call this book, finally available in English, the Bible of sushi chefs. Based on countless interviews over an extended period by a critic who had been better known for his comfort food expertise, marvelously retaining the maestro’s pleasantly down-to-earth voice, and amply illustrated with color photos, here is a belated surprise gift to all serious lovers of sushi who must rely on the vernacular.

  • Move over, garden-variety anti-heroes, and make way for a villain-hero, darker than the darkest knight: a lawyer with a faulty conscience graces us with his unsolicited presence. Not only does Mikoshiba have no qualms about taking on guilty-as-hell clients provided they can pay his exorbitant fees, but his own past seems mired in inexpiable sin. Yet the cynical attorney, whose legal acumen, at least, is impeccable, mysteriously seeks to defend a thirtysomething woman with limited means and below-average looks who has murdered her deadbeat husband. A sordid case if there ever was one, it makes veteran prosecutor Misaki wonder what the bastard is really after. What unfolds is one of the best courtroom dramas ever to come out of Japan.

empty