Kodansha USA

  • Neither a utopia nor a dystopia, it’s still a world of nations at strife, as dominated by corporations as ever. Technology hasn’t made humans nearly obsolete, but rather bettered us, if you will, attaching to our bodies and even brains as enhancements--for those who can afford it.
    Comics artist Shirow Masamune’s vision of our coming society, animated to global acclaim and finally the basis of a major Hollywood production, branches out in five original stories by some of the most beloved SF novelists working in Japan today. A standalone collection, it requires no familiarity with the franchise to be enjoyed but is indispensable for fans for its thoughtful exploration of the series’ implications.
    While reality may never become virtual, it will be increasingly networked and augmented. Navigate herein age-old questions about man that will return, not so ironically, in full force: What is the self? Is there such a thing as the soul?

  • The Seven Deadly Sins--a legendary order that once served the Kingdom of Liones as the mightiest of its Holy Knights--stand accused of treason and have fled the realm. Princess Margaret and young Gilthunder, the slain commander Zaratras’ son, know the terrible truth about the betrayal but dare not speak of it, not even to each other.
    The aftermath of the event that shook Britannia comes to life in seven prose chapters that provide a superb introduction to the rich world of the original comic and satisfy longtime fans’ craving for more. Illustrated in a classic, warm style by the creator himself, Seven Scars They Left Behind walks the royal road of fantasy.

  • Anglais Musashi

    Eiji Yoshikawa

    The classic samurai novel about the real exploits of the most famous swordsman.
    Miyamoto Musashi was the child of an era when Japan was emerging from decades of civil strife. Lured to the great Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 by the hope of becoming a samurai--without really knowing what it meant--he regains consciousness after the battle to find himself lying defeated, dazed and wounded among thousands of the dead and dying. On his way home, he commits a rash act, becomes a fugitive and brings life in his own village to a standstill--until he is captured by a weaponless Zen monk.
    The lovely Otsu, seeing in Musashi her ideal of manliness, frees him from his tortuous punishment, but he is recaptured and imprisoned. During three years of solitary confinement, he delves into the classics of Japan and China. When he is set free again, he rejects the position of samurai and for the next several years pursues his goal relentlessly, looking neither to left nor to right.
    Ever so slowly it dawns on him that following the Way of the Sword is not simply a matter of finding a target for his brute strength. Continually striving to perfect his technique, which leads him to a unique style of fighting with two swords simultaneously, he travels far and wide, challenging fighters of many disciplines, taking nature to be his ultimate and severest teacher and undergoing the rigorous training of those who follow the Way. He is supremely successful in his encounters, but in the Art of War he perceives the way of peaceful and prosperous governance and disciplines himself to be a real human being.
    He becomes a reluctant hero to a host of people whose lives he has touched and been touched by. And, inevitably, he has to pit his skill against the naked blade of his greatest rival.
    Musashi is a novel in the best tradition of Japanese story telling. It is a living story, subtle and imaginative, teeming with memorable characters, many of them historical. Interweaving themes of unrequited love, misguided revenge, filial piety and absolute dedication to the Way of the Samurai, it depicts vividly a world Westerners know only vaguely. Full of gusto and humor, it has an epic quality and universal appeal.
    The novel was made into a three-part movie by Director Hiroshi Inagai. For more information, visit the Shopping area

  • Some Japanese words and phrases, even though they lie at the core of the language, forever elude the student's grasp. They are not explained satisfactorily in dictionaries or textbooks for the simple reason that they cannot be conveniently defined. Japanese Core Words and Phrases brings these recalcitrants to bay.
    The book is divided into two parts, each of which is arranged in alphabetical order. The first part is devoted to words indicating physical as well as psychological distance--roughly equivalent to "this," "that," "that over there," and "where," but quite different in usage. Physical distance is covered in most textbooks, but psychological distance--every student's nemesis--is not.
    The second part of the book covers a variety of idiomatic expressions, many of which appear in Japanese proficiency tests. Each entry word or phrase is not simply explained but exemplified in sentence form, clarifying its meaning (in the case of many students) for the very first time.
    Japanese Core Words and Phrases has a great deal to offer the beginning student and much to offer the intermediate student. Little more can be asked of a book on the Japanese language.
    Previously published in the Power Japanese series as Core Words and Phrases: Things You Can't Find in a Dictionary.

  • Anglais Your Lie in April

    Yui Tokiumi

    THE POPULAR MANGA AND ANIME DRAMA COMES TO LIFE IN WORDS!
    There’s not a competition that piano prodigy Arima hasn’t won since he started playing. His renditions are matchless in their precision. When he’s only eleven, however, his peerless fingers fall silent--right up there on stage.
    Exploring the shock of the incident and its aftermath from his friends and rivals’ perspectives, A Six-Person Etude accompanies the boy’s halting efforts to pick himself up as an adolescent. Based on the hit series, these prose chapters expand on the original but form a coherent and hard-hitting tale of its own.

  • Anglais S

    Koji Suzuki

    Twenty-one years after the legendary bestseller Ring, which spawned blockbuster films on both sides of the Pacific, and thirteen years after Birthday, the seeming last word on iconic villain Sadako and her containment, internationally acclaimed master of horror and Shirley Jackson Award-winner Koji Suzuki makes his much-awaited return to the famed trilogy’s mind-blowing story world with a new novel, S.
    Takanori Ando, son of Spiral protagonist Mitsuo, works at a small CGI production company and hopes to become a filmmaker one day despite coming from a family of doctors. When he’s tasked by his boss to examine a putatively live-streamed video of a suicide that’s been floating around the internet, the aspiring director takes on more than he bargained for. His lover Akane, an orphan who grew up at a foster-care facility and is now a rookie high-school teacher, ends up watching the clip. She is pregnant, and she is…triggered.
    Sinking hooks into our unconscious from its very first pages with its creepy imagery, and rewarding curious fans of the series with clever self-references, here is a fitting sequel to a tale renowned for its ongoing mutations.

  • Shaking the wide plains of Britannia, known only to a select few, is the legendary travelling tavern the BOAR HAT. Gathered in this tavern are the equally legendary Seven Deadly Sins, the proud order of knights that permits no disruption to the order of the Kingdom of Liones.
    In a brief moment of peace before the great war that will test their strengths, the knights gather in the strange tavern to recall their rainbow-­colored histories. The three episodes here reveal their hidden sweet and painful memories.
    With original illustrations accompanying the stories collected here, Seven-­Colored Recollections will continue to immerse readers in the rich, fantastic world of Britannia.

empty